Using Key Bindings in SONAR X1 – Free Map of SONAR X1 Key Bindings

SONAR X1 ProducerOur friends at Roland Australia are big fans of SONAR X1.  They asked us to share the post below on how to improve your workflow by knowing your Key Bindings.

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Using Key Bindings can totally transform how you interact with your SONAR X1. There are hundreds of commands that can literally be placed at your fingertips that can help you navigate or perform a number of editing routines in your SONAR X1 session. If you haven’t done so already, I encourage you to explore this very powerful feature. To help you on your way, we have put together a PDF Doc that maps out all the default Key Bindings. Use the rows and columns as co-ordinates to identify the QWERTY key / modifier combination for the Key Binding.

Download this map of the default SONAR X1 Key Bindings

Not only will it help you to memorize the default settings, you can also use the spreadsheet to plan out and record your own custom Key Binding commands.  If you identify the commands you wish to use in the Keyboard Shortcut list in SONAR X1’s Preferences, then you can add their descriptions to the vacant cells. If you do make changes, make sure you save a copy of your Key Bindings with a new name by using the EXPORT Button on Key bindings Window.

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SONAR X2 Sneak Preview

Seamless. Genius.
From getting great tone to releasing a final mix, today’s musicians must master every element of the music production process. SONAR X2 Producer is there every step of the way, and the revolutionary Skylight interface lets you move seamlessly among the elements, instantly going from recording to editing to mixing and back again. Dial up the perfect synth sound with Rapture or a searing guitar tone with TH2 Producer. Record it, tighten it, chop it, and drop it in the Matrix for realtime triggering. Shape it with the ProChannel. Warm it with the Console Emulator. And do it all with a single Smart Tool. It’s genius.

Get a sneak preview of SONAR X2 Producer

An Audio Journey Through The Signal Path in SONAR X1

A question I am often asked is, “Just what exactly is the signal path in SONAR X1?”. You plug in your mic or instrument and the sound flows through your monitors. But what is the journey your audio signal takes in between? Let’s take a trip through the Channel strip and find out!

Continue reading An Audio Journey Through The Signal Path in SONAR X1

How to get great guitar tones with Guitar Rig 4 LE in SONAR X1 Producer

As a lifelong guitarist and tone hound, I’ve had the pleasure of recording and playing on some of the world’s most cherished amplifiers. My sonic heaven is a set of glowing tubes spilling into a vintage Marshall 4×12 cabinet and projected out at mind numbing volume. But at 3am when I have an idea that just can’t wait and I don’t want to be arrested for disturbing the peace, I find my salvation in Native Instruments Guitar Rig 4 LE which is included in SONAR X1 Producer.

Armed with a guitar and a cable, your choice of great tones await within Guitar Rig 4 LE in just a few steps. From searing, tube style lead tones, thick and chunky metal to crystal clean majesty it’s all there! Continue reading How to get great guitar tones with Guitar Rig 4 LE in SONAR X1 Producer

Converting and Importing Pro Tools SD2 Files from a Mac into SONAR X1

With so many different file formats from digital recording over the last 20 years, sometimes one can be left in a tough predicament trying to get things to work properly.  I was one of those people just recently, so I want to share my experience hoping that I will save someone an afternoon’s worth of conversion work some day.

Old Pro Tools, Digital Performer and Logic programs used a file knows as the .SD2 “Sound Designer File.”  Now if you are like me, you’re always looking for more “sounds.”  Recently I came across a drive that contained killer drum sessions from a record I did at Longview Farms studios a while back.  I knew there were awesome live drums recorded with the best mics and pres along with a slamming drummer.  I jumped on my old Mac, mounted the drive and copied 1.5 gigs of raw SD2 files onto a thumb-drive.

Next, I plugged the thumb drive into my HP workstation and copied the files onto the machine.  To my surprise, when I tried to import the files into SONAR X1 it would not work.  My next logical move was to rename the files with the “.sd2” extension.  After going through this procedure the icons switched into a recognizable symbol, so I was sure that this was the winning formula; but again, the files failed to load.  This time I even got an error message that came along with the grief.

After searching for a remedy I knew I had a problem as most of the help forums read something like this:

I would like to convert some old drum tracks (an album’s worth recorded some time back) from mac sd2 files over to wave files so I can use them in pro tools on pc. Nothing – and I mean NOTHING – I do seems to work.
I tried:
1. Importing the sd2 files in pro tools on the pc but it won’t read them
2. Exporting them as wave files on the mac but pc won’t recognize them
3. Bouncing them as wave files but pc won’t recognize them.

So, after doing a lot of research I found out a few things about the SD2 format in conjunction with the PC:

1.)  If you try to copy SD2 files from a Mac to a PC on an incorrectly formatted drive, the header info is lost along with something known as the resource fork (structured data within a file on a Mac.)  This basically corrupts the file when going from Mac to PC formats.

2.)  By copying files onto the transferring disk that is formatted in FAT file system, the information in the files can be converted after being copied onto a PC.

3.)  You need a trustworthy converter.

Here is exactly how I successfully converted old SD2 files on a Mac onto my Windows 7 HP workstation:

  1. Formatted the transferring thumb-drive so it had the FAT File System
  2. Copied the files onto the thumb-drive and then transferred them onto my PC
  3. Renamed all the new files on my PC with the .sd2 file system
  4. Downloaded and installed a small program called SDTwoWave
  5. Opened the program.
  6. Corrected some of the names of the files as they ended up with bad Characters from the transfer.
  7. Selected the files to be converted in SDTwowav: “SRC” button.
  8. Created a new destination folder on my hard drive and chose it with the “DST” button in the SDtwowav program.
  9. Batch processed all the files.
  10. Went back in and deleted the old SD2 files.

At this point, SONAR X1 recognized and imported the new .wav files with no problem and I had some killer new (0ld) multi-track drums to utilize.

First-Class Upgrade Promotion
From June 1st to June 30th, when you buy or upgrade to SONAR X1 Producer, Cakewalk will automatically bump you up to the flagship version, SONAR X1 Production Suite. Just purchase SONAR X1 Producer from any retailer or upgrade at the Cakewalk Store, and Cakewalk will take care of the rest. Just register your purchase at www.cakewalk.com/register, and you will receive email instructions on how to get your first-class upgrade to SONAR X1 Production Suite.

 

How to make modern music with samples, sequenced drums, and synths – A SONAR Master Class

Modern music production combines many different elements. Loops and samples, sequenced drums and synths, live instruments and more. In this video, you can sit in on a session where all of these elements are used to create a piece of music from start to finish with SONAR X1 Producer.

Pull up a chair, crank up the volume and see just how easy and fun it is to create music when the inspiration strikes using SONAR! After watching the video, download the content pack which includes the Track Templates and presets used in this project.

Continue reading How to make modern music with samples, sequenced drums, and synths – A SONAR Master Class

Drum replacement made fast and easy with SONAR’s AudioSnap 2.0

You’ve got the song, the killer drum performance and everything is ready to mix but there’s one problem. Your kick drum sounds awful and there’s no option to re record the drum tracks. Don’t panic! Using SONAR’s AudioSnap 2.0 and the drum plugin of your choice, you can turn that dud into major thud!

  Continue reading Drum replacement made fast and easy with SONAR’s AudioSnap 2.0

Sidechaining With SONAR’s ProChannel

Ever wondered how to use sidechaining in SONAR X1? Look no further as this step by step, how to video shows you how to achieve professional results with sidechaining using the ProChannel in SONAR X1 Producer.

 

Watch and listen to several different techniques of sidechaining using the PC4K Expander/Gate, PC4K S-Type Bus Compressor and the PC4K S-Type Channel Compressor modules in the ProChannel.

Examples include sidechaining a midi track to control a gate on an audio track, broadcaster style vocal “ducking”, or sidechaining the voice track to control the volume of the background music track, and more!

Learn more about the world of SONAR X1 and watch more tips and tricks videos in full HD on CakeTV

 

Got SONAR X1? Get up and running with our free Get Started series of videos on CakeTV!

So you’ve purchased and installed SONAR X1 and now you’re ready to get in and start making music? Let us make it easy for you with free step by step videos that cover every step of the setup process for all versions of SONAR X1. Available any time you need it, the Get Started series on CakeTV is your on demand resource for the information you need presented in full HD. Watch as we show you everything from setting up your audio interface to recording a track, applying effects and everything in between!

Watch the full Get Started series here

Visit the Get Started with CakeTV page to watch individual videos on setting up your SONAR system.


How to Automate Data Selections in SONAR X1 and Earlier Versions of SONAR

One of the main features of SONAR X1 that has been revamped is Automation. The problem of accidentally clicking on the wrong envelope or node has been eliminated via the new Edit Filter control. SONAR’s Edit Filter allows you to choose the type of active data for editing. Each track in SONAR provides its own individual Edit Filter.

To choose a track’s editing data type, click its Edit Filter control and choose a type from the menu. You can also hover your mouse over the track and open the Tools HUD (press the middle mouse button or press T on your PC keyboard) to access the Edit Filter from there. Once chosen, the data type becomes active, and all other data types become inaccessible so that you don’t make accidental changes. For example, choosing Automation allows you to edit automation envelopes, but it doesn’t allow clip or audio transient editing.

In addition, instead of using the track or Tools HUD to access the Edit Filter, you can Shift+click on a data type to quickly switch to that type for editing. For example, Shift+click on the background of a clip to choose Clip for the Edit Filter. And Shift+right-click switches back and forth between the last two data types. You should also be aware that inactive data can be displayed as either “ghosted” or not shown at all by choosing View > Display > Display Ghosted Data from the Track view menu. For a demonstration of the new Automation and Edit Filter features, watch the video below. Continue reading How to Automate Data Selections in SONAR X1 and Earlier Versions of SONAR

SONAR X1- The DAW that plays well with others

Whether you’re mixing down or pulling individual tracks for use with a collaborator, SONAR’s flexible export options make the process fast and simple. Continue reading SONAR X1- The DAW that plays well with others